Greg Howard   Chapman Stick artist   Free Hands two-handed tapping instruction
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    Free Hands is the name Emmett Chapman, musician and inventor gave to his two-handed tapping method of parallel hands.
    He discovered this playing method on a home-built nine-string guitar in August, 1969. Free Hands wasn't the first two-handed tapping method, but it was the first in which both hands could be "equal partners" with the fingers of left and right hand lining up with the frets, from opposite sides of the board. This makes it possible for each hand to play the same scaler and melodic lines and chord shapes.
     When Emmett started building instruments for other musicians in 1974 he published a collection of lessons he had been teaching to guitar players and new Stick players. This collection is called Free Hands: a new Discipline of Fingers on Strings, and it is by far the most widely circulated text on two-handed tapping.
     Greg has been teaching Free Hands since 1995, to hundreds of students at seminars around the world, in private lessons, and by videoconference (Skype and Google Video Chat). He has written two comprehensive books on the playing method, The Stick Book Volume 1 (1997), and the Greg Howard Songbook (2009).

FREE LESSON DOWNLOADS
Download free Stick lesson pdfs by Greg here.
—Understanding Diatonic Modes Part 1 (December 27, 2014).

DVD
Find out more about Greg's lesson DVD:
Basic Free Hands Technique.

BOOKS
Find out more about Greg's books for the Free Hands method here:
Greg's Books.

SKYPE LESSONS
info about videoconference lessons here:
Skype and Google Chat Lessons.

EMMETT'S METHOD
If you'd like to know more about the origins and development of Chapman's Free Hands method see:
Stick and Method History.


Greg demonstrates how the inverted 5ths
tuning works for bass and chords in the left hand.


Greg plays his song "Del Mar"
from the Greg HOward Songbook.


A video of Emmett on the nationally syndicated
TV quiz show "What's My Line" in 1974.